Snow Chains

Discussion in 'General Super Duty Discussion' started by 01yellerCobra, Jan 4, 2017.

Car Parts
  1. 01yellerCobra

    01yellerCobra Full Access Member

    Messages:
    418
    Likes Received:
    80
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2015
    Location:
    San Diego
    What snow chains do you guys recommend for a 4x4? I'm planning on heading up to Big Bear towards the end of the month. I've heard I don't need chains with a 4x4, but I was looking at Big Bear's traffic site and it says I have to at least carry them. Which brings me to my next question... Do I need to chain up all four tires or can I put it in 4WD and just chain up the fronts?
     
  2. snicklas

    snicklas Super Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    46
    Messages:
    412
    Likes Received:
    23
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2008
    Location:
    Greenfield, Indiana
    Not sure on what to chain up. I would say if it's icy, chain up all 4 and run in 4x4.

    Now my opinion on chains. DO NOT BUY THE AIRCRAFT CABLE POS's....... I only run chains on my garden tractors, and have for over 40 years.... I picked up a set of the cable chains when I had 2 tractors that needed chains, and only had 1 set. The cable chains were at a thrift store, and would fit my size tire. I took the tractor out with the cable chains, and only made it 1 pass down the driveway, maybe 30 feet, and the first time the wheel spun, the cable chain came off. I limped back to the garage, took them off and literally threw them as far as I could.

    I recommend a set of 2 link, or 4 link real chains. If you want to get the V-Bar or fancier, thats fine. But a good set of ladder style chains work really well. The nice thing about a 2 link set, is there are more cross bars, which means less bumping from the chains. A 4 link set will work well, they will just bump more.

    2 link vs 4 link chain, the number of links between cross links on the side chain. Meaning:

    2 link is cross, empty side link, empty side link, cross

    4 link is cross, empty, empty, empty, empty, cross

    I have a set of 4 link on each tractor... and they work well for moving snow....

    IMG_20151108_143935.jpg IMG_20151108_143949.jpg


    These are what I recommend against:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. BIG JOE

    BIG JOE Full Access Member

    Messages:
    5,423
    Likes Received:
    55
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2005
    Location:
    CenCal
    What Scott Said !;tu;tu
     
  4. snicklas

    snicklas Super Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    46
    Messages:
    412
    Likes Received:
    23
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2008
    Location:
    Greenfield, Indiana
    A couple of other things.

    Do not run them on dry roads.... not trying to sound stupid.... but it does need to be said..... just like 4x4.... only run them if you need it....


    Watch your speed..... Yes, because it's slick if you are using chains, but, centrifugal force will pull the cross chains away from the tire, like a jump rope. So it's IMPERATIVE to install them correctly, and as tight as possible. For me, on the tractors, I deflate the tire, install the chains as snug as I can, and them re-inflate the tire to proper pressure ~12lbs. This makes them fairly tight and limits the "flail" the chains have. As you can see, I have very limited clearance, and it's not uncommon to see the rear fenders damaged due to chain flail


    Practice installing them several times, at home in the driveway. Chains are not necessarily difficult to install, but I would not want to try installing them on the shoulder of a road. I've read of people make the comment on the Cub forum make the comment it only took me an hour to get the chains installed this time. Now, this is the second or third time of installing them. Myself on the other hand, I can take the decks off, install the blade, thrower and both sets of chains in an hour. But, I've done the swap/install probably a hundred times in the last 40 years. They make tire chain install ramp, that allows the chains to lay in grooves, so they can move, but are placed under the tire. I normally have the tire off the ground, and "roll" them onto the tire, but that is different getting ready for winter in October, vs on the side of the road.

    [​IMG]


    When you get them, remove them from their container, and make sure they are straight. Meaning, look like a ladder lying on the floor. The set of chains I got with one of my tractors had just been in a pile. It took me almost an hour to straighten out both chains so they could be installed. All the cross links on the same side of the cross chain, and the side chains lying straight. The chains can "pass through" between 2 cross links, and become tangled. This also makes them shorter....... When I store mine, they get removed from the tire, and I immediately hang them on 2 nails on the wall of the garage and let them hang until I need them again..... They NEVER get put down, the only thing they touch is the tire, and the 2 nails........

    If you take care of them, chains can last a very long time. The set of chains on the tractor with the snow thrower were purchased new in 78 or 79 and have been used every winter and also for several years in the fall when we would plow the garden. They are not perfect, and have had a couple of repairs, but they still do their job and help me remove the snow.
     
  5. 01yellerCobra

    01yellerCobra Full Access Member

    Messages:
    418
    Likes Received:
    80
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2015
    Location:
    San Diego
    Wow. A lot of info. Thank you very much. I was planning on trying to install them before I went anywhere with them. It's like playing with a new toy for me anyway. Since the chains are going to be stored in the truck most of the time will it be hard to keep them from getting tangled?
     
  6. snicklas

    snicklas Super Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    46
    Messages:
    412
    Likes Received:
    23
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2008
    Location:
    Greenfield, Indiana
    I know that some come in a bag. If you place them carefully in the bag, they should stay fairly neat.

    Or, place a few hooks across the back of the cab, and hang them, similar to the way big trucks hang chains under the trailer.
     

Share This Page